WORLD MALARIA DAY 2020 2aa.jpg

World Malaria Day

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A mother sits under a bed net with her two-year-old son in Mon State, Myanmar CREDIT: VLAD SOKHIN/WHO/PANOS PICTURES

What is . . . Malaria?

Image Courtesy, Wikipedia - Mikael Häggström

MUST SEE VIDEO

Video Courtesy, Darby

Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease of [which affects] humans and other animals caused by protists (a type of microorganism) of the genus Plasmodium. The protists first infect the liver, then act as parasites within red blood cells, causing symptoms that typically include fever and headache, in severe cases progressing to coma or death. The disease is widespread in tropical and subtropical regions in a broad band around the equator, including much of Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

 

 

Five species of Plasmodium can infect and be transmitted by humans. Severe malaria is largely caused by P. falciparum while the disease caused by P. vivax, P. ovale, and P. malariae is generally a milder form that is rarely fatal. The zoonotic species P. knowlesi, prevalent in Southeast Asia, causes malaria in macaques but can also cause severe infections in humans. Malaria is prevalent in tropical regions because the significant amounts of rainfall, consistently high temperatures and high humidity, along with stagnant waters in which mosquito larvae readily mature, provide them with the environment they need for continuous breeding. Disease transmission can be reduced by preventing mosquito bites by distribution of mosquito nets and insect repellents, or with mosquito-control measures such as spraying insecticides and draining standing water.

 

 

The World Health Organization has estimated that in 2010, there were 216 million documented cases of malaria. Around 655,000 people died from the disease, many of whom were children under the age of five.[1] The actual number of deaths may be significantly higher, as precise statistics are unavailable in many rural areas, and many cases are undocumented. P. falciparum — responsible for the most severe form of malaria — causes the vast majority of deaths associated with the disease. Malaria is commonly associated with poverty, and can indeed be a cause of poverty and a major hindrance to economic development.

 

 

Despite a clear need, no vaccine offering a high level of protection currently exists. Efforts to develop one are ongoing. Several medications are available to prevent malaria in travelers to malaria-endemic countries (prophylaxis). A variety of antimalarial medications are available. Severe malaria is treated with intravenous or intramuscularquinine or, since the mid-2000s, the artemisinin derivative artesunate, which is superior to quinine in both children and adults and is given in combination with a second anti-malarial such as mefloquine. Resistance has developed to several antimalarial drugs, most notably chloroquine and artemisinin.

Above Definition Courtesy, Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia

Learn more about Malaria on the following web page:

United Nations

ZERO MALARIA:

Must be achieved for . . .

. . . ALL of Humanity!

On World Malaria Day 2020, WHO joins the RBM Partnership to End Malaria in promoting “Zero malaria starts with me”, a grassroots campaign that aims to keep malaria high on the political agenda, mobilize additional resources, and empower communities to take ownership of malaria prevention and care.

We know that through country leadership and collective action, we can radically reduce suffering and death from malaria. Between 2000 and 2014, the number of malaria-related deaths fell by 40% worldwide, from an estimated 743 000 to 446 000.

But in recent years, progress has ground to a standstill. According to WHO's World malaria report 2019, there were no global gains in reducing new infections over the period 2014 to 2018. And nearly as many people died from malaria in 2018 as the year before.

Urgent action is needed to get back on track, and ownership of the challenge lies in the hands of countries most affected by malaria. The “Zero malaria” campaign engages all members of society: political leaders who control government policy decisions and budgets; private sector companies that will benefit from a malaria-free workforce; and communities affected by malaria, whose buy-in and ownership of malaria control interventions is critical to success. Join us in our shared effort to get to zero malaria.

Text Courtesy, United Nations - WHO

Learn more about . . .

World Malaria Day

on the following WHO web pages:

Courtesy, WHO

Is the World continuing

to work toward . . .

 "ZERO MALARIA?"

Courtesy, WHO

More than nets are needed:

an effective cure for

Humanity's victims of

Malaria is . . .

"LONG OVERDUE!"

- EPACHA Foundation -

EPACHA Foundation Extends

Sincere Thanks to

UNITED NATIONS

A n d

for allowing use of images, visuals and

print presented herein.

If you’ve missed the work of EPACHA in its Phase I duration, please be encouraged to click on the below web links.

Sincerest Thanks are Extended to http://archive.org/web/ for having made possible an archived viewing of

 

EPACHA Foundation’s entire volume of its Phase I web pages:

EPACHA Foundation - All Rights Reserved

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